Mortgage

What is a Deed of Trust?

A deed of trust is an arrangement among three parties: the borrower, the lender, and an impartial trustee. In exchange for a loan of money from the lender, the borrower places legal title to real property in the hands of the trustee who holds it for the benefit of the lender, named in the deed as the beneficiary. The borrower retains equitable title to, and possession of, the property.

The terms of the deed provide that the transfer of legal title to the trustee will be void on the timely payment of the debt. If the borrower defaults in the payment of the debt, the trustee is empowered by the deed to sell the property and pay the lender the proceeds to satisfy the debt. Any surplus will be returned to the borrower.

Deed of trust is a document which pledges real property to secure a loan, used instead of a mortgage in the following states; Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

If you have any questions about deeds of trust, or real estate law, call the Law Office of Gregory A. Ross, PC at 940-692-7800, or email us at info@gregoryrosspc.com